Children and Hunger

Medical data provides compelling evidence that hungry children, even those who experience only milk under-nutrition during the critical stages of their development, may suffer negative life altering consequences. Children denied an adequate diet may suffer abnormal cognitive, brain and psychological development which, if not corrected, can be irreparable.

 

 

 

 

As the above chart suggests, a large portion of those served by Feeding America are under the age of 18. This means that many children are not able to receive the proper nutrition they need to do well in school. It is also more difficult for a hungry child to succeed in the classroom. They suffer more absences due to illness, have shorter attention spans and, in general, have a harder time learning. A child that is unequipped to learn because of hunger and poverty is more likely to be poor as an adult. Although hunger has usually been considered a consequence of poverty, evidence now suggests that childhood hunger may also be a cause of poverty.


 

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